Shipping discharge PIB most recent kills

This should never happen – a lubricant, polyisobutene (PIB) used to improve engine performance is still allowed to be discharged from ships and has record of killing thousands of birds. This is an excerpt from The Guardian UK report on this ongoing tragedy:

“It said PIB becomes strongly adhesive in the sea, coating the birds and restricting their movements and their ability to feed. Tony Whitehead, from the RSPB, said: “This is one of the worst marine pollution incidents in decades, bringing to mind other disasters going right back to the Torrey Canyon in 1967.” Adam Grogan, from the RSPCA, said: “The dumping at sea of this lethal chemical must be stopped. “It was heartbreaking enough after the first incident in February to see so many birds arrive at our centres in such a poor state. “The sticky substance coated their feathers and made it difficult for them to feed and move so staff had to work around the clock to wash it off and get them fit enough to survive in the wild again. “For it to happen twice in quick succession is inexcusable and unacceptable.” The charities have urged members of the public to sign petitions by Avaaz and 38 Degrees to support their call for a ban of dumping chemicals at sea. Post-mortem examinations have been carried out on hundreds of the dead birds by the British Trust for Ornithology and the results are due to be published within the next few weeks.”

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2013/may/03/birds-die-chemical-spill?INTCMP=SRCH

Watertown Daily Times | Canadian senator prods IJC to approve Bv7 water plan

Blurb on legislation to balance shoreline resident interests with tourist operators and shipping: Canadian Sen. Robert W. Runciman is urging the International Joint Commission to “quit stalling” and adopt the proposed Plan Bv7 water management plan. In a news release, Mr. Runciman said the current approach cuts short the boating season by almost a third and threatens wetlands in the Thousand Islands. The senator said Plan Bv7 is the best approach he’s seen to balance the interests of shoreline residents along Lake Ontario, tourist operators on the upper St. Lawrence River, Seaway shipping companies, the Montreal harbor and the environmental movement. http://www.watertowndailytimes.com/article/20130306/NEWS03/703069888