Fall is here!

I’ve been worried these last few days of summer and now fall is here! The maple and birch leaves have been falling. Swirls of leaves follow me as I walk along the trail. But the leaves are green and spotted! Where are the fall colors? May I just be anxious for cooler climes. Perhaps but with the wind and rain being so plentiful as of late I fear the fall colors nature brings with the changing seasons may be compromise.

AS I look out my window, the leaves seem to be talking to each other; they sway back and forth in the wind. Last night I heard numerous conversations of chattering leaves. What does one leaf say to another? Maybe they are pleading with one another to hold on to their branches or maybe they are encouraging each other to fly away with the wind.

Miraculously I found a yellow rose in my rose bush recently. I swear it is pink now. Do roses change color? Whatever, it is a wonderful sight. The rain has brought all sorts of colorful mushrooms up from the ground – orange, purple and of course white. Plenty of tiny little toads hopping about too and slender long snakes slithering about the driveway. No bloodsucking gnats like last year. I couldn’t even open doors to enjoy the wonderful cool weather as the gnats were so tiny that they could squeeze through the screens! The plague of gnats, inside and out, were annoying to say the least. No bloodsucking attacks – at least as of yet.

As I ramble on steadied with glee of autumnal comings, my mind goes to all the things that need to be completed before winter gets here. I’ll make a list but for now I am going to enjoy the blissfulness of fall’s arrival. I think I will go crunch some fallen foliage beneath my feet, dogs in tow!

Plan Released for Klamath River Dam Removal | American Rivers

https://www.americanrivers.org/2018/06/plan-released-for-klamath-river-dam-removal/

“The Klamath River project will be the most significant dam removal and river restoration effort yet. Never before have four dams of this size been removed at once which inundate as many miles of habitat (4 square miles and 15 miles of river length), involving this magnitude of budget (approximately $397 million) and infrastructure.

But perhaps more important than the size of the dams is the amount of collaboration and the decades of hard work that have made this project possible. American Rivers has been fighting to remove the dams since 2000. And thanks to the combined efforts of the Karuk and Yurok tribes, irrigators, commercial fishing interests, conservationists, and many others, our goal of a free-flowing river is now within reach.”

Biggest dam removal ever! Klamath was largest salmon producer until dams interrupted reproduction cycles.

Don’t let Congress lock the public out of the courts! – Waterkeeper Alliance

https://waterkeeper.org/dont-let-congress-lock-the-public-out-of-the-courts/
Section 437 of the bill attempts to block judicial review of all agency decisions regarding the environmental review of a proposed water transfer project in California known as the “delta tunnels project,” or “California WaterFix.”

The bill is cited in article.

Audio: Proposed federal water bill would streamline new dam projects | 89.3 KPCC

http://www.scpr.org/news/2017/01/09/67954/proposed-federal-water-bill-would-streamline-new-d/

The bill would codify into federal law the 1994 Bay Delta Accord, an agreement between state and federal authorities to coordinate water use and quality standards for water in the California Delta, where the confluence of the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers enters Suisun Bay and flows toward the Pacific Ocean. Making the accord a federal law would restore water deliveries to Central California users that were “cut off by environmental lawsuits and a series of illogical regulations,” Valadao says in the bill’s summary.”

Stream lining dam project process good for farmers but what about the environment?

Exeter’s Great Dam Removal :: NOAA Fisheries

https://www.greateratlantic.fisheries.noaa.gov/stories/2016/september/08_exeter_s_great_dam_removal.html

Good news for boaters! And everyone!

Friday, September 9, the town of Exeter, New Hampshire celebrates the removal of the Great Dam and the restoration of the Exeter River. The town will hold a public ceremony in Founders Park at 10am.

There have been dams along the Exeter River since the 1640s or so. The Great Dam, named for the nearby Great Falls, was built around 1831 to provide power to Exeter’s mills. After coal and oil power came to Exeter, the Great Dam continued to provide power to Exeter businesses into the mid-20th century. When the dam’s owner sold the dam and factories in 1981, the Great Dam was donated to the Town of Exeter.

With the need for the dam gone, the Great Dam fell into disrepair. In 2000, the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services advised the town that the dam had serious safety and flooding issues. The Town considered repairing, modifying, or removing the dam, and finally decided that removing the dam was the best solution.

Great Dam Removal Project SignView slideshowExeter’s Great Dam Removal Project

Opening 21 Miles of River “

Great Lakes water quality issues to be focus of public forum – News – Voice News

http://www.voicenews.com/articles/2016/09/09/news/doc57d2f5619eab5141364661.txt

Weigh in on environmental issues on Oct 4, in Toronto Canada. If you are a citizen of the US or Canada you are invited to participate. Go to IJC.ORG to find out more. So your part to protect the Great Lakes.