‘Democracy died in Thailand today’: impeached PM | The National

http://m.thenational.ae/world/southeast-asia/democracy-died-in-thailand-today-impeached-pm

Clip on impeachment of Thailand’s PM:

” Experts say the impeachment and criminal charges are the latest attempt by the country’s royalist elite, and its army-backers, to nullify the political influence of the Shinawatras, whose parties have won every election since 2001.”

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Increase in supply of Russian sex workers and prices go up? | econfix

 Explanation for increase in sex workers in Ukraine and increasing prices….inflation not Veblen goods?

Econofix writes/cites in his blog:

Neither are sex services consistent with other types of goods that have upward-sloping demand (Giffen goods, goods with network effects, goods with bandwagon effects).

More likely, Uralpolit.ru and the Moscow Times have demonstrated temporary economic illiteracy. Increased supply doesn’t increase prices. On the other hand, inflation does increase prices and that is what is being observed.

https://econfix.wordpress.com/2014/12/22/increase-in-supply-of-russian-sex-workers-and-prices-go-up/

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Murky Waters in Uzbek City – Institute for War and Peace Reporting – P220

Georgy Vitryakov reporting on lack of resources to insure steady flow of clean water to Uzbekistan city of Angren. There are regulations to treat water supply with chlorine and ultraviolet light but chlorine is in short supply though it is more likely to be used during the rainy seasons – spring and fall. Residents are often told to boil the water before use. Georgy reporting:

“Problems with water provision in this city of 170,000 people, about 100 kilometres south of Uzbekistan’s capital Tashkent, stem from years of under-investment in the local treatment plant. The poor state of the infrastructure has forced staff to cut corners just to keep any kind of supply going.

In Soviet times, Angren developed into an industrial centre, with engineering, construction materials and rubber factories all powered by the plentiful coal deposits in the area.

One resident, a pensioner who gave his name as Ilhom, described how householders stored up water in buckets and plastic containers whenever the taps were working.

“After we let the water settle, there’s always dirt, mud or sand at the bottom. When it rains, the water coming out of the tap is brown and smells of clay,” he said. “It’s always been like that. What can we do about it?”

Daily power cuts interrupt the pumping of water through mains pipes, and this is compounded by numerous leaks in the network. A source at the city’s hygiene and disease prevention agency told IWPR that perhaps 90 per cent of the mains network was in need of repair or replacement.

The situation is only made worse by people in villages near Angren tapping into the mains supply to divert water for their own use.

Officially, health experts say that problems with the supply are not a danger to human health. Angren’s hospital refused to provide data on waterborne diseases, while the city hygiene agency said it had only recorded one case in the last five years, which involved people drawing contaminated water from a well rather than from the mains supply.

Doctors say that boiling tap water should ensure it is safe, and Angren’s residents have been made aware of this.”

Go to IWPR website for full article:

http://iwpr.net/report-news/murky-waters-uzbek-city?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+iwpr-rca+%28IWPR+Central+Asia+Full+Text+%29

Arctic or Turkish Pamukkale?

Impressive huh? Especially since it looks like the Arctic. In actuality, it is Pamukkale Turkey. The limestone reacts with the water to create travertine that gives the surrounding ridges their snowy white appearance. It was 40 degrees Celsius when this picture was taken by “jeff”. It was a popular Roman hangout in the day known for its healing waters.

http://careerbreaksecrets.com/10558/jeffs-blog/healing-waters-of-pamukkale

Bombay duck is dying. Blame fishing, warming

An article from The Times of India explores the effects of climate change & ocean waters warming on fish stocks and the fishing and culinary industries. Here is an excerpt from the article followed by a link for those who want to read more. “…Of most concern perhaps is the fate of the state’s famous Bombay duck. As with other fish, catch rose through the 1960s and ’70s due to increased mechanized fishing. But the five-year average of annual landings of the fish has reduced by more than a third from 30,000 tonnes in the 1980s to around 20,000 tonnes now, according to CMFRI. Fishing pressures may also be causing this fish to mature earlier, producing fewer eggs. Only a few, low-value species saw an increase.: sardine (taarla) catch went up by 142%, mackerel (bangda) by 133% and tuna by 70%. Until the late 1990s, sardines and mackerel were rarely found north of Ratnagiri. If the decline continues, the new home for Bombay duck, albeit a different species, may be West Bengal; catch of the fish has increased in that state as well as in Orissa as fisheries in the east have developed in recent years. Silver pomfret has also been severely affected, with its five-year average of annual landings dropping almost 80% from 24,000 tonnes in the 1980s to just over 5,000 tonnes in recent years, said Deshmukh. In fact, of 25 important fish stocks in the state, only two species are still abundant, found a CMFRI assessment from 2007 to 2011. More than half are in decline. The drop in stocks is due to overfishing and the increased demand for certain seafood. Fish stocks here can sustain around 8,000 boats with reasonable profit, according to CMFRI estimates, but the actual number of boats plying the region is over 17,000. Of these, around 5,600 are trawlers ”almost twice” the optimal number. Boats are also catching younger, smaller fish, giving populations less of a chance to reproduce. Climate change may add to the pressures on local stocks. Larger fish tend to be more sensitive to environmental changes…” http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/2013-03-09/flora-fauna/37580464_1_bombay-duck-fish-stocks-species

Uzbeks Seek Turkmen Support on Water Dispute – priming for water war?

Excerpt from Institute for War and Peace (IWPR) reporter John McLeod on border tensions developing in Central Asia over water for irrigation and hydroelectric energy production: Uzbekistan remains resolutely opposed to hydroelectric dams under construction in Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan, which it believes will obstruct the normal flow of water down the Amu Darya and Syr Darya rivers. The water is essential to its population and for its irrigated agriculture. Kazakstan and Turkmenistan are also dependent on this water, but have been less outspoken on the Tajik and Kyrgyz dam projects. Qurbon Yovshanov, a political analyst in Tashkent, notes that Nazarbaev mentioned water shortages in Kazakstan, Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan during his meeting with Karimov last month. Yovshanov said Karimov was now trying to spur his Turkmen and Kazak neighbours on to more “radical measures” to block Tajik and Kyrgyz energy plans. http://iwpr.net/report-news/uzbeks-seek-turkmen-support-water-dispute