Higher outflows and field data collection this summer

http://m.sootoday.com/content/news/details.aspx?c=90655

“The International Lake Superior Board of Control, under authority granted to it by the International Joint Commission, expects to increase the Lake Superior outflow for the month of May.

The increased outflow is expected to exceed the capacities of the hydropower plants on the St. Marys River in May, and therefore the excess will be released through the control structure at the head of the St. Marys Rapids.

“The outflow of Lake Superior will be adjusted over the next several months to accommodate expected maintenance at the hydropower plants, and to reduce the potential for adverse consequences of high and fluctuating flows in the St. Marys Rapids.”

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Gov’t Urged to Fund Basin Plan: IJC | Rainy River Record

http://www.rainyriverrecord.com/node/20766

It also follows two periods of public review and feedback, and builds upon considerable co-operative work and planning that has been undertaken in the basin in recent years.” The Plan of Study identifies five themes of concern, and strongly recommends funding for 32 projects and activities to support a balanced approach to water quality management, in response to concerns by governments, researchers, local residents and indigenous peoples about the basin’s ecosystem health.

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Counties pan lake-level management plan

http://m.thedailynewsonline.com/mobile/news/article_c3948f74-8cbd-11e4-8507-dbaf0fe7aad8.html

Johnson told her colleagues that IJC Plan 2014 would negate the benefits from dredging completed this fall by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers dredging of the Oak Orchard Harbor.

The dredging removed more than 10 years of sediment from a federal channel actively used by boating, sport-fishing and recreation activities. Allowing for higher-highs and lower-lows in lake levels would wash that maintenance away, Johnson said.

“Dredging our harbors cost well over $1 million, and yet the federal government-appointed IJC has put forth a plan that would devastate our harbors,” said Johnson, who  cited estimates of $3.5 million in damages to shoreline protection systems. “This is government at its worst.”

Negotiations continue….

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WXXI News | The Public Media news source for Rochester, NY and the Finger Lakes

The International Joint Commission oversees the management of Lake Ontario. For fifty years, a hydro-electric dam has regulated the naturally fluctuating shoreline. Frank Bevacqua of the IJC says scientific advancements show that the existing plan is harmful to the environment.

“The remaining 64,000 acres of coastal wetlands along Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River have been degraded.”

In response, the IJC has put forth Plan 2014

image

http://m.wxxinews.org/?utm_referrer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com%2F#mobile/23981

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Lake of the Woods Plan

The IJC wants to hear from you before submitting its recommendations to the Governments of Canada and the United States. The International Lake of the Woods Basin Water Quality Plan of Study is available for review and comment for a 30-day period, from November 12 to December 11, 2014.

See more at: http://www.ijc.org/en_/LOWWQPOS#sthash.434NiC6a.dpuf

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Public lecture on danger of microplastics to Great Lakes | Windsor Star

http://blogs.windsorstar.com/news/public-lecture-on-danger-of-microplastics-to-great-lakes

Skin, beauty and bath care products can contain the tiny bits of plastic that go down the drain and end up being flushed through the municipal sewage treatment system and into lakes and into the bellies of fish.

“It doesn’t go away,” said Parent. Toothpastes and deodorants are among the other common products that can contain microplastics, although some manufacturers are avoiding their use.

Once entering the Great Lakes waterway, the microplastics not only become a threat to aquatic life, but also endanger and become a contaminant for humans through the food chain.

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DNR adds to list of unwanted aquatic invasive species

http://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/MIDNR/bulletins/da0807

Excerpt:

The Department of Natural Resources today announced the addition of seven species to Michigan’s prohibited species list of aquatic invasive species. An additional species already on the list was also modified from a prohibited species to a restricted species.

Any species considered for listing as prohibited or restricted must be not native to Michigan. Prohibited species generally are not present or are in very limited areas, whereas restricted species are generally widespread and naturalized within the state. 

The decision came during the Nov. 6 meeting of the Natural Resources Commission, where DNR Director Keith Creagh signed Invasive Species Order Amendment No. 1 of 2014

Prior to this order there were 33 aquatic species listed as prohibited or restricted. The following species were added to the prohibited species list:

•  Stone moroko – part of the minnow family, this species is a known carrier of a parasite that can negatively impact other fishes. 
•  Zander – a close relative of the walleye, this species could compete with the native fish or reproduce with it and create a hybrid. 
•  Wels catfish – this fish is considered a serious danger to native fish populations. 
•  Killer shrimp – this species is an aggressive predator and could severely threaten the trophic levels of the Great Lakes by preying on a range of invertebrates. 
•  Yabby – this large crayfish would negatively impact other crayfish species. 
•  Golden mussel – similar to zebra and quagga mussels, this species has destructive qualities that would threaten native biodiversity. 
•  Red swamp crayfish – this species can quickly dominate waterbodies and is virtually impossible to eradicate. 

Additionally, rusty crayfish were moved from prohibited to restricted classification to allow for their limited possession for the purpose of destroying them for consumption, fertilizer or trash. This species already is widespread throughout the state, yet regulations previously didn’t allow for the collection of them for consumptive purposes.
 

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