Great Lakes water quality issues to be focus of public forum – News – Voice News

http://www.voicenews.com/articles/2016/09/09/news/doc57d2f5619eab5141364661.txt

Weigh in on environmental issues on Oct 4, in Toronto Canada. If you are a citizen of the US or Canada you are invited to participate. Go to IJC.ORG to find out more. So your part to protect the Great Lakes.

Rediscovering Native American roots at pipeline protest – BBC News

http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-37171280

Since April, over 3000 Native American people have been camping in Cannon Ball, North Dakota. They are trying to stop the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, which would run underneath the Missouri river near the Cheyenne river reservation.”

Video by Anna Bressanin

Greenland Inuit oppose open-pit uranium mine on Arctic mountain-top – The Ecologist

http://www.theecologist.org/News/news_analysis/2988016/greenland_inuit_oppose_openpit_uranium_mine_on_arctic_mountaintop.html

“Recently I [Bill Williams] was invited to assess an old Danish uranium exploration site in Kvanefjeld in southern Greenland.”

Inuit Ataqatigiit – the opposition party in the national parliament – had asked me to talk to local people about the health implications of re-opening the defunct mine.

An Australian firm called Greenland Minerals and Energy (GME) has big plans to extract uranium and rare earth minerals here. It would be a world first: an open-pit uranium mine on an Arctic mountain-top.

Any questions?

World’s Loneliest Elephant Dies After Spending 60 Years Alone in a Tiny Concrete Cell – Earthables

http://www.earthables.com/elephant-dies-alone-1831679185.html?xrs=RebelMouse_fb

People need to read Hank’s story!

Animals

World’s Loneliest Elephant Dies After Spending 60 Years Alone in a Tiny Concrete Cell

By EarthablesFOLLOW

uniunitwins/Flickr

Hanako the elephant, who has been called the world’s saddest elephant has passed away after spending 60 years in a tiny cell at Inokashira Park Zoo in Japan.

She was 69 years old.

In the six decades Hanako spent in her cell, she never got to feel soft grass or dirt under her feet, or the bark of trees with her trunk, and worst of all, she hadn’t seen another elephant for most of her adult life….”

Read on, never forget Hank….Life so precious….Support animal rights

Tenerife island, rojo

http://earthsky.org/todays-image/international-space-station-over-tenerife?utm_content=bufferca832&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer

Check this out:

“Roberto Porto posted this photo at EarthSky Facebook in late May, 2016. It’s a pass of International Space Station (ISS) over Tenerife, one of Spain’s Canary Islands. The large plant is a tajinaste rojo, an endemic plant of this island. Roberto said the tajinaste plants typically blossom in May on this island, and he said some grow as high as 10 feet (3 meters). Of his photo, he wrote:”

image

Fukushima Keeps Fighting Radioactive Tide 5 Years After Disaster – NYTimes.com

http://mobile.nytimes.com/2016/03/11/world/asia/japan-fukushima-nuclear-disaster.html?em_pos=large&emc=edit_nn_20160311&nl=morning-briefing&nlid=60578025&_r=0&referer=

Update on Fukushima clean up:

“But a full cleanup of the site — including the extraction of melted uranium fuel from the damaged reactor cores — is expected to take at least 40 years according to the government’s timetable and a century by other estimates. In the meantime, officials acknowledge, Fukushima remains vulnerable.”

Could Insurance Markets Help Water Utilities Respond to Drought? | Circle of Blue WaterNews

http://www.circleofblue.org/waternews/2016/world/could-insurance-markets-help-water-utilities-respond-to-drought/

Here’s a market solution to consider, President Trump

Researchers propose a new financial tool. Implications for Great Lakes?

I am quoting from an article written by Bret Walton for Circle Blue. He lays out the problem of water shortages out west and introduces the idea of “water insurance” just as we have car or flood insurance.
Greg Characklis, professor at UNC at Chapel Hill, further explains the notion in the following paragraphs:

“Utilities need to change their business models to adapt to 21st-century conditions. In an era of conservation, argues Greg Characklis, water utilities must become more sophisticated financial managers. One way they are doing this is by changing their rate structures so that they earn more revenue from “fixed” fees that do not fluctuate with the amount of water sold.

Characklis, a professor in the department of environmental sciences and engineering at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, has another idea: insurance markets. Farmers buy crop insurance to protect against unpredictable weather and drivers purchase accident protection, but no similar product exists for water utilities. Characklis and his colleagues are assessing the viability of the new financial tool.”